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CANNAN DOG

Dogsora

Life span: 12-15 Years

Height: 51-61cm (Male); 48-58cm (Female)

Weight: 20-25kg (Male); 16-20kg (Female)

Cannan dogs are alert, vigilant, intelligent breeds which can protect your livestock. These dog breeds emerge from Israel and are not hypoallergenic. Pet owners with allergies can adopt these Cannan dogs to shower their love. Cannan dogs are about 2000-3000 varieties and are found in distinct parts of the world.

Physical Characteristics

The Canaan’s body is medium sized and strong, with a furry tail that remains high and sometimes curls over the body, and large ears that remain erect. Its eyes can be hazel or brown, with a black nose. Its coat is short, straight and relatively dense, and it can be black, brown, light brown, white, and red. The coat may be one solid color, or patched with two different colors.

History

Many believe this dog has its origins in very ancient times, specifically in biblical times, in the land known as Canaan, where it was called Kalef K’naani. It was said their use was that of guard dogs and herders for the Israelites, and many painting were found of them in Beni-Hasan’s tombs, around 2200 B.C. When the Israelites had to leave due to the Romans’ arrival, these dogs were left in different desert areas, including a natural reservoir. In 1930, Dr. Rudolphina Menzel was looking for a breed that could handle tough climate and land, working for the Israeli Defense Force. She found the Canaan and further bred it to be war dogs. They had jobs such as detecting jobs or being messengers, as well as helping the Red Cross during the second World War by finding injured soldiers. Later, they became popular as guide and helper dogs. In 1965 this breed appeared in the United States, and by 1997 it had become a member of the American Kennel Club’s herding group.

Personality

This breed is highly intelligent and loyal towards its family. Even though it has an independent nature, it tends to get attached to its owner, or one specific person within the family. They tend to get along well with other household pets and children, although they should be properly socialized. However, they will be wary and even aggressive towards strange animals, especially dogs. Training can be relatively easy, as these dogs tend to be obedient, but they can become easily bored. Variation during the training sessions is highly important, as this breed needs both mental and physical stimulation. They are active, although not overly so, but don’t expect them to be quiet, since they tend to bark a lot due to their protective nature.

Health

Canaan dogs do not suffer from any breed specific hereditary diseases, however, they may rarely suffer from:

Hip dysplasia, a hereditary disease in which there is an abnormal formation in the hip socket, that may eventually cause painful arthritis. It may also be affected by the environment they reside in.

Hypothyroidism, a disease that affects the thyroid gland, its symptoms are ear infections, skin infections, hair loss, lethargy, and depression.

Von Willebrand’s Disease, which is a blood disease that affects the clotting process, its symptoms can be nosebleeds, prolonged bleeding from surgery, occasional blood in stools, etc.

Thrombopathia, a blood platelet disorder that affects blood clotting.

Care

Their coat needs only weekly brushing, daily during shedding season, and occasional baths. Their nails should be trimmed regularly, as well as their teeth brushed and ears checked for any dirt to prevent infections. The Canaan can be content with a daily walk with its owner, although it enjoys training and participating in competitions. Early socialization and training are a must with this breed in order for it to not turn aggressive. Training can be relatively easy but needs to be varied and taught through positive reinforcement.

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